ELHN Conference 2017 – CFP « Environemental Labour History »

[Version française]

For decades, research in environmental history and labor history ignored each other. Although industrial nuisances affecting the neighbors of industrial activities primarily concerned workers within these plants, the history of occupational health have long been written separately from the history of industrial pollution (and reciprocally). Many reasons explain this fragmentation. In France, this separation is based on the shaping of two distinct sets of laws to deal with the negative effects of industrialization during the nineteenth century. On the one hand, regulation on harmful factories was elaborated as a response to nuisances to the neighborhood. On the other hand, labor laws focused on workplaces and on the management of the wage relationship. By defining this perimeter, workplaces were gradually separated from their environment.

Yet, in the late seventies, French sociology have been attracted by the study of environmental practices of the workers and their organizations. More significantly, in 1995, Richard White invited historians to understand that human societies firstly experienced their environment and produced knowledge on the natural world through work. He stressed that work continually led to shift the line between elements described as natural or artificial[1]. In the meantime, Arthur McEvoy encouraged the development of an ecological approach of occupational health and hygiene issues[2]. Nevertheless, these researches often remained isolated and fragmented until recent years. It is only recently that historiographical agendas have been drafted in order to reinforce the relations between environmental history and labor history[3].

Among the recent works contributing to shape an environmental history of work and labor, three main tracks should be identified :

  • Firstly, the study of industrial diseases is a common ground for these historiographies. By observing industrialization processes during the nineteenth century, recent studies highlighted how environmental and health issues have gradually been obliterated[4]. Different studies proposed to analyze the nuisances of peculiar industries, such as the mines[5] or lead companies[6]. These researches emphasized the different management of the same pollution, depending on whether it affected people at work or neighbors outside of factories. In the meantime, several historians are taking this chance to shape new narratives and analyze nuisance both in and out the workplace. For instance, some authors proposed the notion of « industrial hazard regimes[7]», while other are elaborating narratives to examine « industrial oveflows[8] » (débordements industriels).
  • Secondly, another dynamic research field focuses on the study of environmental and health concerns of the organizations claiming to speak on behalf of workers. Several recent case studies observed the making of these concerns during the sixties and the seventies in different national contexts, such as Spain[9], United-States[10], Canada[11] or Australia[12]. More systematic works have been led on the Japanese[13], Italian[14] and French organizations. Most of these historians studied the intervention of these organizations both in and out workplaces. Yet, while they developed the notion of working-class environmentalism, these studies tended to concentrate exclusively on the second half of the twentieth century.
  • A third perspective should be stressed because of its willingness to seize synchronously the transformation of coal miners’ work and the environmental upheavals related to this exploitation in the specific context of a growing dependence of the US economy to fossil fuels. In his book, Thomas Andrews shapes the notion of « workscape », defined as « a place shaped by the interplay of human labor and natural processes. The workscape concept treats people as laboring beings who have changed and been changed in turn by a natural world always under construction ( …). Wherever people work, the boundaries between nature and culture melt away[15]». This concept opens an unprecedented field of research in which new research could flourish.

This session of the EHLN congress aims to bring together researchers from different academic backgrounds whose works contribute to the vitality of this research field. While this session will provide a review of the existing work, it will also give a visibility to these approaches to labor historians. This session will eventually offer an opportunity to open up new research perspectives for the making of an environmental history of work and labor.

Coordinators :

Renaud Bécot (Centre d’histoire de Sciences Po – Paris) – renaudbecot@gmail.com

François Jarrige (Centre Georges Chevrier – Université de Bourgogne – fjarrige1@gmail.com

Thomas Le Roux (Centre de Recherches Historiques – EHESS) – oekoomeo@gmail.com

Please send an abstract of your proposal to the coordinators until the 15th April 2017

[1]
Richard White, «  »Are You an Environmentalist or Do You Work For a Living ? » : Work and Nature », William Cronon (dir.), Uncommon Ground. Rethinking the Human Place in Nature, New York, Norton, 1996, p.171-185

[2]     Arthur McEvoy. « Working Environments: An Ecological Approach to Industrial Health and Safety », Technology and Culture 36/2, 1995, p. 145–72.

[3]     Stefania Barca, « Laboring the Earth. Transnational reflections on the environmental history of work », Environmental History, 19/1, 2014 ; Gunther Peck, « Fault Lines and Common Ground in Environmental and Labor History », Environmental History, 11/2, 2006, p. 212-238.

[4]     Thomas Le Roux, « L’effacement du corps de l’ouvrier. La santé au travail lors de la première industrialisation de Paris (1770-1840) », Le Mouvement Social, n° 234, 2011, p. 103-119 ; Caroline Moriceau, Les douleurs de l’industrie. L’hygiénisme industriel en France, 1860-1914, Paris, Editions de l’EHESS, 2009.

[5]     Judith Rainhorn (dir.), Santé et travail à la mine, XIXe-XXIe siècle, Lille, Presses Universitaires du Septentrion, 2014.

[6]     Judith Rainhorn, Poison légal. Une histoire sociale, politique et sanitaire de la céruse et du saturnisme professionnel (XIX-XXe siècle), Paris, Presses de Sciences Po, 2017 [à paraître].

[7]     Christopher Sellers et Joseph Melling (dir.), Dangerous Trade. Histories of Industrial hazards across a globalized world, Philadelphia, Temple University Press, 2012

[8]     Thomas Le Roux et Michel Letté (dir.), Débordements industriels. Environnement, territoire et conflit (XVIIIe-XXIe siècle), Rennes, Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2013.

[9]     Pablo Corral Broto, « Une société environnementale et ouvrière ? Histoire de la lutte du mouvement ouvrier pour défendre l’environnement sous Franco (1964-1979) », Écologie & Politique, n° 50, 2015, p. 41-55.

[10]   Scott Dewey, « Working for the Environment : Organized Labor and the Origins of Environmentalism in the United-States, 1948-1970 », Environmental History, n° 3/1, 1998, p. 45-63 ; Chad Montrie, Making a Living. Work and Environment in the United-States, Chapel Hill, The University of North Carolina Press, 2008.

[11]   Katrin MacPhee, « Canadian Working-class Environmentalism, 1965-1985 », Labour/Le Travail, n° 74, 2014, p. 123-149.

[12]   Meredith Burgmann et Verity Burgmann, Green bans, Red union. Environmental Activism and the New South Wales Builders Labourers Federation, Sydney, New South Wales University Press, 1998.

[13]   Paul Jobin, Maladies industrielles et renouveau syndical au Japon, Paris, éditions de l’EHESS, 2005.

[14]   Stefania Barca, « Bread and poison. The story of labor environmentalism in Italy, 1968-1998 », Christopher Sellers et Joseph Melling (dir.), Dangerous Trade. Histories of Industrial hazards across a globalized world, Philadelphia, Temple University Press, 2012, p. 126-139 ; Stefania Barca, « Work, bodies, environment. The  »class ecology » debate in 1970s Italy », Nathalie Jas et Soraya Boudia (dir.), Powerless Science ? Science and politics in a toxic world, New York, Bergahn, 2014, p. 115-133.

[15]   Thomas Andrews, Killing For Coal. America’s Deadliest War on Labor, Boston, Harvard University Press, 2008.


Vers une histoire environnementale des mondes du travail

Pendant plusieurs années, les recherches en histoire environnementale et en histoire du travail se sont ignorées mutuellement. Bien que les nuisances industrielles qui affectent les riverains des entreprises polluantes concernaient au premier chef les salariés, l’histoire de la santé au travail fut longtemps rédigée séparément de l’histoire de la pollution industrielle (et réciproquement). Les raisons de cette fragmentation sont multiples. En France, cette séparation renvoie à la formation de deux corpus juridiques distincts pour répondre aux effets négatifs de l’industrialisation au cours du XIXe siècle. D’une part, le droit des établissements classés répond aux nuisances extérieures aux entreprises. D’autre part, le droit du travail se concentre sur l’espace productif et sur l’aménagement de la relation salariale. En traçant ce périmètre, il sépare le lieu de travail de son environnement.

La sociologie francophone fut pourtant, de manière éphémère, attirée par l’étude des pratiques environnementales des mondes ouvriers. Plus encore, dès 1995, Richard White invitait les historiens à étudier le travail comme le premier vecteur de connaissance de l’environnement. Il soulignait que l’activité de travail contribuait continuellement à déplacer la ligne de démarcation entre des éléments qualifiés de naturels ou d’artificiels[1]. Au même moment, Arthur McEvoy incitait à développer une analyse écologique des enjeux d’hygiène et de santé au travail[2]. Ces efforts sont toutefois restés souvent isolés et fragmentés jusqu’à ces dernières années. Plusieurs propositions historiographiques ont été formulées pour renforcer les intersections entre l’histoire environnementale et l’histoire du travail[3].

Parmi les travaux menés pour forger une histoire environnementale du travail, trois principales pistes peuvent être distinguées :

  • en premier lieu, l’étude des maladies professionnelles constitue le terrain le plus fréquent de rencontre entre ces historiographies. En examinant les processus d’industrialisation au XIXe siècle, plusieurs études récentes contribuent à enrichir la compréhension des modalités d’effacement des effets sanitaires et environnementaux de la production[4]. Plusieurs recherches se sont proposées d’étudier les nuisances propres à certaines industries, comme dans les mines[5] ou dans les entreprises de la céruse[6], en soulignant la gestion différenciée d’une même nuisance selon qu’elle affecte l’ouvrier au travail ou le riverain des activités polluantes. Des notions offrent toutefois l’opportunité d’élaborer des récits ou des concepts pour étudier à la fois la nuisance dans et hors l’espace productif, à commencer par celles de « régime des risques industriels[7]» et celle de « débordement industriel[8] ».
  • Une deuxième piste de recherche porte sur l’intervention environnementale et sanitaire des organisations qui prétendent parler au nom des travailleurs. Plusieurs contributions ponctuelles ont permis d’identifier la formation de ces préoccupations dans les années 1960 et 1970 dans les syndicats espagnols[9], américains[10], canadiens[11], ou australiens[12]. Des recherches plus systématiques ont été consacrées aux organisations japonaises[13], italiennes[14] et françaises. Ces travaux se proposent fréquemment d’étudier l’intervention de ces organisations dans et hors l’espace productif. Toutefois, en élaborant la notion d’environnementalisme ouvrier, ces travaux tendent à se concentrer exclusivement sur la seconde moitié du XXe siècle.
  • Une dernière perspective de recherche se démarque par sa volonté d’étudier de manière synchrone la transformation du travail des mineurs de charbon et les bouleversements environnementaux liés à cette exploitation, en les identifiant comme des conséquences d’une dépendance croissante de l’économie américaine aux énergies fossiles. Thomas Andrews forge ainsi la notion de workscape, afin d’étudier « les individus comme des êtres au travail [working beings], qui ont changé et ont été changés en retour par un monde  »naturel », qui demeure en reconstruction constante (…). Quel que soit le lieu où les individus travaillent, les frontières entre la nature et la culture s’entremêlent toujours[15]». Cette notion ouvre ainsi un champ de recherche inédit, dans lequel de nouveaux travaux pourraient s’épanouir.

Cette session du congrès de l’EHLN vise donc à rassembler des chercheurs dont les travaux contribuent à la vitalité de ce champ de recherche. La session doit offrir la possibilité de réaliser un bilan d’étape des travaux existants, de donner une visibilité à ces approches auprès des historiens du travail, mais aussi d’ouvrir de nouvelles perspectives de recherche pour l’élaboration d’une histoire environnementale du travail.

 

Coordinateurs :

Renaud Bécot (Centre d’histoire de Sciences Po – Paris) – renaudbecot@gmail.com

François Jarrige (Centre Georges Chevrier – Université de Bourgogne) – fjarrige1@gmail.com

Thomas Le Roux (Centre de Recherches Historiques – EHESS) – oekoomeo@gmail.com

Les propositions de communication devront être transmises avant le 15 avril 2017.

[1]
Richard White, «  »Are You an Environmentalist or Do You Work For a Living ? » : Work and Nature », William Cronon (dir.), Uncommon Ground. Rethinking the Human Place in Nature, New York, Norton, 1996, p.171-185

[2]     Arthur McEvoy. « Working Environments: An Ecological Approach to Industrial Health and Safety », Technology and Culture 36/2, 1995, p. 145–72.

[3]     Stefania Barca, « Laboring the Earth. Transnational reflections on the environmental history of work », Environmental History, 19/1, 2014 ; Gunther Peck, « Fault Lines and Common Ground in Environmental and Labor History », Environmental History, 11/2, 2006, p. 212-238.

[4]     Thomas Le Roux, « L’effacement du corps de l’ouvrier. La santé au travail lors de la première industrialisation de Paris (1770-1840) », Le Mouvement Social, n° 234, 2011, p. 103-119 ; Caroline Moriceau, Les douleurs de l’industrie. L’hygiénisme industriel en France, 1860-1914, Paris, Editions de l’EHESS, 2009.

[5]     Judith Rainhorn (dir.), Santé et travail à la mine, XIXe-XXIe siècle, Lille, Presses Universitaires du Septentrion, 2014.

[6]     Judith Rainhorn, Poison légal. Une histoire sociale, politique et sanitaire de la céruse et du saturnisme professionnel (XIX-XXe siècle), Paris, Presses de Sciences Po, 2017 [à paraître].

[7]     Christopher Sellers et Joseph Melling (dir.), Dangerous Trade. Histories of Industrial hazards across a globalized world, Philadelphia, Temple University Press, 2012

[8]     Thomas Le Roux et Michel Letté (dir.), Débordements industriels. Environnement, territoire et conflit (XVIIIe-XXIe siècle), Rennes, Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2013.

[9]     Pablo Corral Broto, « Une société environnementale et ouvrière ? Histoire de la lutte du mouvement ouvrier pour défendre l’environnement sous Franco (1964-1979) », Écologie & Politique, n° 50, 2015, p. 41-55.

[10]   Scott Dewey, « Working for the Environment : Organized Labor and the Origins of Environmentalism in the United-States, 1948-1970 », Environmental History, n° 3/1, 1998, p. 45-63 ; Chad Montrie, Making a Living. Work and Environment in the United-States, Chapel Hill, The University of North Carolina Press, 2008.

[11]   Katrin MacPhee, « Canadian Working-class Environmentalism, 1965-1985 », Labour/Le Travail, n° 74, 2014, p. 123-149.

[12]   Meredith Burgmann et Verity Burgmann, Green bans, Red union. Environmental Activism and the New South Wales Builders Labourers Federation, Sydney, New South Wales University Press, 1998.

[13]   Paul Jobin, Maladies industrielles et renouveau syndical au Japon, Paris, éditions de l’EHESS, 2005.

[14]   Stefania Barca, « Bread and poison. The story of labor environmentalism in Italy, 1968-1998 », Christopher Sellers et Joseph Melling (dir.), Dangerous Trade. Histories of Industrial hazards across a globalized world, Philadelphia, Temple University Press, 2012, p. 126-139 ; Stefania Barca, « Work, bodies, environment. The  »class ecology » debate in 1970s Italy », Nathalie Jas et Soraya Boudia (dir.), Powerless Science ? Science and politics in a toxic world, New York, Bergahn, 2014, p. 115-133.

[15]   Thomas Andrews, Killing For Coal. America’s Deadliest War on Labor, Boston, Harvard University Press, 2008.